Cicely Staffordshire Bull Terriers

& Griffon Bruxellois

 

Staffordshire Bull Terrier Information

Thinking of a Stafford?

Breeding from your Stafford?

 

To those thinking of a Stafford as a pet;

  • Please learn as much about the breed as you can before getting a dog.
  • Visit a few shows even if you don't wish to show, you will be able to talk to owners and meet the dogs.
  • Join a SBT breed club, these are an fantastic way to learn about the breed and to meet other like minded people, most clubs have newsletters, 3 shows, as  well as holding seminars, fundays and other social events.  Contact the secretary initially they will be able to help and advise you and should you decide this is the breed for you they will know who has puppies available.
  • The Staffordshire Bull Terrier is a 'people' dog and as such they are not good guard dogs, their friendliness to people and love for children has earned them a much deserved nickname the 'nanny dog' although this friendliness does not normally extend to other dogs, the breed typically is not dog friendly and this must be remembered when considering the breed.

 

General Information

Here is a page of general information on dogs, including advise on responsibility, choosing a boarding kennels, travel with your dog, children and dogs etc.

 

 

SBT Breed Clubs

There are 18 Staffordshire Bull Terrier breed clubs within the UK, whether or not you intend to show your Stafford, it is a good idea to join your local breed club.  Go along to a training evening or a breed show and meet the dogs and owners, before you buy a puppy, then if you decide this is the breed for you, Contact the secretary initially they will be able to help and they will know which reputable breeder has puppies available


 

Is the Stafford right for you?

The Staffordshire Bull Terrier Breed Council of GB & NI has issued some very good advice on different aspects relating to the Staffordshire Bull Terrier, in the following links to the breed councils webpages.

Guidelines for Purchasing a Puppy & is the breed right for you?

Brief History of the Breed

SBT Breed Standard

 


Could your dog be stolen?

No exact figures are compiled but many pedigree dogs of all breeds are stolen every year, due to the Staffords love of people, this makes Staffies a very easy target, please read the Stolen page to make sure you are aware of this very real threat. 

Should you have lost or found a dog then do look at www.doglost.co.uk a nationwide internet service with a wide circulation list.


Staffords.co.uk

The UK premier Stafford website offers an insight into the breed with links to various breed clubs and breeders websites, staffords.co.uk also offers the latest show results.

 


 

Breeding

Thinking of Breeding from your Stafford?

Think very carefully before breeding from your Stafford, the breed is getting ever more popular every year, which incurs problems such as dogs needing to be re-homed, there simply aren't enought of the right kind of 'Good' homes to go round. 

Thinking about using your dog at Stud?

Additionally Stud dog owners should satisfy themselves that a bitch is fit to be bred from, registered at the Kennel Club, clear of PHPV/HC under a Kennel Club approved eye testing scheme, before allowing their dog to be used at stud.


Puppies (Tips for New Breeders & New Owners)

Your First Litter

Should you decide to breed from your bitch after giving the matter a lot of thought and you have spoken and read all you can, ENSURE that both your bitch and your chosen stud dog are both Kennel Club registered and are both tested clear for PHPV/HC - You will also need to ensure all the puppies are tested at a few weeks of age.

Then you will of course want to ensure that you are responsible and find the best homes for any puppies, firstly you will need a list of questions to ask prospective owners, click here for examples and then when you have decided on who will have one of your puppies, ensure that you give the new owners as much information and help both before and after that you are able too, all owners should be given a puppy pack which should include information on food/exercise/training, click here for an example, which can be adapted by breeders with puppies or for prospective new owners this the type of thing you should get which can be adapted to suit your puppies.  In addition maybe include in the price of each puppy a years membership for the new owners to their local SBT breed club.  With the breed becoming ever more popular and todays society becoming everymore 'throw away' you should remember that you have a responsibility for any puppies for the rest of thier lifes and should be prepared to help re-home any puppy should the new home not work out for whatever reason.

Your First Puppy

Should you be wanting to buy a Stafford puppy, do not be offended by the breeder asking you lots of questions, in fact I would advise not buying from anyone that didn't - Most breeders of Staffords will only keep a couple of dogs and they will be very much 'part of the family' and they will want only the best homes for their puppies.  Thus said I would always go through your local SBT breed club to get a list of reputable breeders with puppies, you will then also have a chance to talk to the secretary of the club whom may well be able to advise you on any other queries you may have and be able to advise you on what to look for.  Expect to be initially asked a lot of questions on the phone, and then you will need to visit the puppies it is also advisable for all the family to go, you will undoubtably have questions, these may help you:

Expect to see the mother with the puppies

Ask to see the mothers Kennel Club registration papers (don't be fooled by a handwritten/typed 'pedigree') which should be stamped with her eye test pass, to ensure you are seeing the correct Kennel Club documentation then click here for an example

Don't expect to see the stud dog as he will probably be owned by another breeder, but you should be able to see a photograph, a copy of his pedigree which should be stamped with his HC/PHPV eye test pass.

Ask whether the puppies have had their eyes tested yet for PHPV and HC and if not when will they be - if not don't buy them? 

Ask whether the parents and puppies have been tested for L2-HGA if not don't buy them?

Read the SBT Breed Councils guidelines, these have been compiled to help YOU

The breeder should want only the best homes for their puppies, so expect to visit more than once and when you eventually pick up your puppy the breeder should of compiled you at the very least a sheet with puppies meal times and details of what he is being fed. Click for example

For more information and help in finding a puppy, contact your local SBT breed club


 

C O L O U R S              C O L O U R S           C O L O U R S             C O L O U R S

The Stafford coat colour under it's breed standard can be Black, Brindle, White, Red, Blue, Fawn or any of these colours with    White.  None of these colours are rare, do not pay anymore money for so called 'rare' colours. (Staffords are sometimes seen with Black/Tan or Liver coats these colours are undesirable should you wish to 'show' your Stafford but will not make any difference to a Stafford wanted as a family pet).

 


Training your Stafford  &  Finding a Training Club

The Stafford is a very intelligant breed although with a somewhat stubborn streak, in todays intolerant society towards dogs, all dogs should have at least basic obedience skills and 'good manners'.


HEALTH ISSUES

Ensure that when you buy a puppy that both parents are tested for PHPV/HC and L2 HGA

 

Eye Problems

The Stafford is generally a very healthy breed but it is imperative for the future health of the breed that we are all vigilant with regard to the hereditary eye problems, PHPV (Persistent Hyperplastic Primary Vitreous) and Hereditary Cataract, should you be thinking of buying a puppy or breeding from your bitch ALWAYS make sure that the eyes are tested for these two conditions.

For details of local testing sessions see either the dog press 'Dog World' or 'Our Dogs' or contact your local SBT breed club, alternatively click here for eye testing sessions

Alternatively you may contact the British Veterinary Association, 7 Mansfield Street, London W1M 0AT   Tel: 0207- 636-6541  e-mail: bvahq@bva.co.uk for names of panellists who can test, or visit their website www.bva.co.uk

 

L2 HGA

"A NEW NEUROLOGICAL CONDITION"

Called L2-HGA L2 hydroxyglutaric aciduria In the past few years a small number of Staffords have been diagnosed with a metabolic disorder; its clinical title is L-2 hydroxyglutaric aciduria or L-2 HGA. This condition has manifested itself in varied ways with dogs exhibiting behaviour changes and dementia (staring at walls, getting stuck under tables and in corners, loss of obedience and house training), anxiety states, having full blown seizures, as well as exercise intolerance, ataxia (unsteady gait), tremors and muscular stiffness. Dogs from differing bloodlines have been found to be sufferers and the number of affected dogs diagnosed has risen. The disorder (and a similar linked disorder, D-2 HGA) is found in humans, again very rare, but nevertheless, devastating for the families affected by it. The disorder has an autosomal recessive method of inheritance, meaning that both parents must be carriers of the defective gene to produce affected offspring.  See www.staffords.co.uk for further details


Breed Specific Legislation (BSL)

Staffords have through no fault of their own along with many other popular breeds of dogs have been caught up in draconian BSL laws in Germany which as the UK are part of Europe are not opposed could potentially mean the laws being implemented here.  Visit the DOMINO pages for further information.


 

SBT Welfare

Think about rehoming a Stafford, or do you need to rehome your Stafford

There are many groups devoted to Staffordshire B.T. Rescue in the UK and most  work together and support each other when necessary. In addition there is Staffordshire Bull Terrier Welfare, a national body and registered charity.

The aim of the welfare is to be a kind of umbrella. Part of the charter is to educate and inform the public. Moral support is given to the rescue groups when needed, as well as financial support to groups and individual cases with kenneling, vets bills etc.